The sixth installment of the Jurassic Park franchise — “Jurassic World: Dominion” — came roaring and stomping into theaters on June 10. Like any apex tyrannosaur trying to claim box office territory, it had to compete with something meaner and tougher, namely Tom Cruise’s "Top Gun" sequel, which is still rocketing in its popularity.

But this new film about cloned dinosaurs didn’t immediately get killed off. In fact, it has more than made back its budget in worldwide box office numbers. Filmed on a budget of $185 million, it is projected to surpass $500 million in ticket sales worldwide by the time you read this.

That’s an amazing opening, but given critics’ reviews and audience responses, it’s curious to see what kind of drop-off it might have in the following weeks as more summer films open.

The movie sees returning cast members Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard teaming up with veteran cast members Sam Neill, Jeff Goldblum and Laura Dern who reprise their roles from the original 1993 film.

There is a heavy reliance on nostalgia for the original film in both the dialogue and visual references dotted throughout the movie. The callbacks are done tastefully, even adding to the suspense and danger in some scenes.

The use of the legacy characters is done far better then what Disney LucasFilm did with the "Star Wars" sequel trilogy; while "Star Wars" killed off their legacy characters unceremoniously, "Jurassic World" empowers them. These are characters who know how to survive against beasties running amok.

The film centers on two plot threads: The legacy characters are investigating a potential ecological disaster caused by genetic engineering, while Pratt and Howard‘s characters are searching for their “adopted“ daughter who has been kidnapped by the same antagonists.

The two storylines dovetail as the first generation and newest generation of characters join up to help each other survive in a valley filled with animals trying to eat them. 

The story isn’t bad per se, but it feels as though the sequel trilogy jumped the shark even if all six movies remain thematically consistent. The concern all the way back to the beginning of the series has been the power inherent in genetic technology and manipulation — and as Goldblum‘s character, Ian Malcolm, repeatedly points out, you can’t control this power and it will turn the chaos.

As has been the case for nearly 30 years, the best-laid plans of mice and men frequently get torn in half by vicious Cretaceous predators.

It feels like there is some wasted potential for this movie. At the end of the previous entry, we see a world forced to acknowledge the presence of dinosaurs in the modern day. While we get some interactions, the movie falls back on the familiar formula of sticking its characters in a remote area, fighting to get out alive.

Two of the promotional sequences released on YouTube were not in the movie, while much of the publicity and promotional material gave away the return of the legacy characters as if the studio involvement wanted to play it safe with the nostalgia baiting rather than doing something gutsy by showing humans adapting to co-habitate with these creatures.

The film's ending also feels a little cliché by science-fiction standards; everything is wrapped up nice and neat through news coverage exposition telling us what happened rather than showing us with the camera.

This movie is by far not the worst in the franchise, that honor still belongs to "Jurassic Park 3," but it is a stronger entry than the previous film. Avoid going into the theater with any expectations for what you think might happen.

This movie is by far not the worst in the franchise, that honor still belongs to "Jurassic Park 3," but it is a stronger entry than the previous film. Avoid going into the theater with any expectations for what you think might happen.

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